Lest We Forget (8)

(Continuing our series on the events of 1919 with the help of the daily newspaper of the First Dail,
the Irish Bulletin.)

LEST WE FORGET (8)

The following are Acts of Aggression committed in Ireland by the Military and Police of the usurping English Government as reported in the Daily Press for week ending September 27th. 1919 :-

The sentences imposed in the 5 cases mentioned above totalled 3 years, 1 month.

Monday, September 22nd 1919.

Raids:– Some ten branches of the Cumann na mBan, (Irish Women’s League), were raided by fully armed Police in Co. Tipperary. In Co. Roscommon similar raids took place on several branches of the same league. Armed police raided the residence of Mr. Peadar O’ Hourihane, Irish Language Organiser, at Kinsale, Co. Cork, carrying away all letters and documents written in the Irish Language. Large forces of Military and Police raided three of the principal printing works in Dublin, Messrs P. Mahon; Cahill & Co. and the Wood Printing Press, dislocating the machinery. A similar raid took place upon the printing works of the “Dundalk Examiner”, Co. Louth. At Roscrea and Clogheen, police raided five newspaper shops and confiscated part of the stock. At Dundalk, twelve newsagent’s shops were raided and papers carried off. At Midleton, Co. Cork, armed police raided a newsagent’s shop and took away all copies of Republican papers.  [read more …] “Lest We Forget (8)”

LEST WE FORGET (9)

[Continuing our series on the events of 1919 with the help of the daily newspaper of the First Dail, the Irish Bulletin.]

LEST WE FORGET (9)

THE FOLLOWING ARE ACTS OF AGGRESSION COMMITTED IN IRELAND BY THE MILITARY AND POLICE OF THE USURPING ENGLISH GOVERNMENT AS REPORTED IN THE DAILY PRESS FOR THE WEEK ENDING OCTOBER 4th, ’19.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29th, 1919.
[read more …] “LEST WE FORGET (9)”

Lest We Forget 7

LEST WE FORGET (7)
THE FOLLOWING ARE ACTS OF AGGRESSION COMMITTED IN IRELAND BY THE POLICE AND MILITARY OF THE USURPING ENGLISH GOVERNMENT – AS REPORTED IN THE DAILY PRESS-
FOR THE WEEK ENDING,
September, 13th, 1919

During the foregoing six days English Military terrorism in Ireland reached its high water mark. The town of Fermoy was sacked by English Military, English troops appeared on the streets of Dublin and shot down four young men. The English representatives in Ireland decreed the suppression of the elected Government of the Irish people; the vast army of occupation was set loose upon the nation and forcibly entered the houses of over a thousand of its respected citizens.  [read more …] “Lest We Forget 7”

Lest We Forget (6)

[Continuing our series on the events of 1919 with the help of the daily newspaper of the First Dail, the Irish Bulletin.]

THE FOLLOWING ARE ACTS OF AGGRESSION COMMITTED IN IRELAND BY THE POLICE AND MILITARY OF THE USURPING ENGLISH GOVERNMENT – AS REPORTED IN THE CENSORED DAILY PRESS— FOR WEEK ENDING:- 16th AUGUST, 1919.

DATE:- August 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th Total.
Arrests:- 7 2 2 4 15
Sentences:- 5 1 1 3 10
Armed Assaults:- 3 1 1 5
Militarism:- 1 1
Suppressions &
Proclamations:-
2 3 6 1 12
Courtmartials:- 3 8 1 12
Raids:- 20 2 1 1 13 37
Daily Total 37 6 10 17 6 16 92

Sentences for the week, as reported in Press, amounted to 52 months imprisonment.

MONDAY, AUGUST 11th, 1919.
Raids:- Large forces of police and military, fully armed, forcibly
entered and searched many houses situated upon the left bank
of the river Shannon. Upwards of 20 houses were thus raided
and searched.
Arrests:- Two men, whose names have not transpired were arrested near Portmore, Co. Armagh, because they participated in a Republican meeting which was proclaimed by the English military.
Sentences:- Michael and Timothy Spillane of Carrigaha,Castlegregory, Michael Flynn and Michael Griffin of Cappananee, and Michael Maunsell of Duagh all of the Co. Kerry, were sent to prison until December to await trial for the “attempted murder” of two policemen who were not even wounded. The five men indignantly protested their innocence but upon the evidence of policemen the paid magistrate committed them to prison.  [read more …] “Lest We Forget (6)”

Lest We Forget (5)

[Continuing our series on the events of 1919 with the help of the daily newspaper of the First Dail, the Irish Bulletin .]

LEST WE FORGET (5)

The following are the Acts of Aggression committed in Ireland by the Military and Police of the Usurping English Government, as reported in the Censored Daily Press, during the week ending  July 26th, 1919.

MONDAY, 21st JULY, 1919.

Sentences :- For collecting for Dail Eireann without a permit from the “authorities”. William Jackson, Michael Jackson, and Michael Cahill, were at Foynes, Limerick, sentenced to one month imprisonment in default of bail. They were removed to Limerick prison under a strong military and police escort. The Misses N. Fitzgibbon; M.E. Harris, M. Owens; A.M. McDonald; E. Coleman; and J. O’Brien, Youghal, Co. Cork, were fined at the Petty Sessions for selling flags without a permit. The accused did not appear at the Court; Miss Harris stated she had a permit for Mr. de Valera, and Miss Fitzgibbon said she had one from the Irish Republic. The flags were inscribed “Help Central Europe – Starving.”  [read more …] “Lest We Forget (5)”

Lest We Forget (4)

LEST WE FORGET (4)

THE FOLLOWING ARE ACTS OF AGGRESSION COMMITTED IN IRELAND
BY THE MILITARY AND POLICE OF THE USURPING ENGLISH GOVERNMENT, AS REPORTED IN DAILY PRESS, DURING THE WEEK ENDING, JULY 12th, 1919.

ATROCITIES.

Monday, 7th July, 1919.
Discharged without trial: Mr. Patrick O’Brien, one of the three brothers arrested on suspicion in connection with the Silvermines shooting, was released after being 18 months in custody.
Raids:- Extensive house-to-house searches were made over large areas to the North and West of Newmarket, Co. Cork, by fully equipped British military and police.  The raiders were accompanied by military wagons, armoured cars, and Red Cross cars, filled with armed soldiers.  Two old disused shot-guns – the sole result of the raid – were found and commandeered.
Proclaimed. The annual Tipperary Feis (Gaelic League Festival) to be held in Thurles on Sunday last, was proclaimed by the British authorities on Friday.  Large forces of military and police, with full war equipment, were drafted into the town on Sunday.  The promoters decided not to hold the Feis, although such a course resulted in heavy financial loss to them.

Tuesday, 8th July, 1919.
Arrests.
Austin Geraghty and Peter J. Loghlon, Doolin District, Co. Clare, were arrested by British military and police in connection with the shooting of two R.I.C men near Kilfenora, Co. Clare. Michael Byrne, Camlough; Patrick Osborne, Gib Street, Belfast; Owen MacCroosh, Eshavany, and Patrick McShane, Cross, were arrested in connection with an alleged assault on two R.I.C. men at Camlough, Co. Armagh on Sunday last.  They were brought before a Special Court at Camlough Barracks and remanded to Forkhill Petty Sessions on the 12th August. John Mahon, Gurteen, Newtownbarry, Co. Wexford, was arrested for failing to pay a fine imposed on him for collecting funds for Dail Eireann without a Permit from the British authorities.  He has been “wanted” for some time on this charge. Robert Hegarty, 3 Kimmage Road, Dublin, was arrested on a charge of illegal drilling, and remanded  in custody until Friday next.
Proclamation:- Sinn Fein, Sinn Fein Clubs, Cumann na mBan, the Irish Volunteers, and the Gaelic League in the County Tipperary were “prohibited and suppressed” by Proclamation published to-day.  Two Proclamations were issued by the British Authorities, the first to cover the suppression  in the North Riding area of Co. Tipperary, the second to cover the suppression of the South Riding area. An Aeridheacht announced for Castlepollard on Sunday last was proclaimed and large forces of British  military and police were drafted into town to enforce the proclamation.  Military guards were placed on all the approaches to the town.  A meeting was held at the Market Square and was addressed by Mrs. Sheehy-Skeffington.
Armed Assault:- A District Inspector with a force of fully armed police came on the scene and ordered the dispersion of the meeting. On being asked for his authority the D.I. ordered a baton charge.  Several people were injured in the charge, and the crowd retaliated with stones.  The D.I. then ordered  the police to fire, and for a time matters looked very  serious.  For some reason the police failed to obey the order, and after a time the people dispersed quietly in spite of the great provocation. After the arrest of John Mahon at Newtownbarry (vide above) a crowd numbering about 300, collected and boohed and hissed the police.  Four or five police rushed out of the barracks and attacked the crowd with batons.  A small number of the crowd were dispersed, but the large majority  held their ground, with the result that a regular melee ensued.  In the meantime a military wagon of British soldiers arrived on the scene.  They fixed bayonets and charged the crowd, with the result that a large number of people were wounded.  [read more …] “Lest We Forget (4)”

LEST WE FORGET (3)

(Continuing our series on typical events of 1919 with the help of the First Dail’s newspaper, the Irish Bulletin)

LEST WE FORGET (3)

THE FOLLOWING ARE THE ACTS OF AGGRESSION COMMITTED IN IRELAND BY THE MILITARY AND POLICE OF OUR USURPING ENGLISH GOVERNMENT DURING  THE WEEK ENDING JUNE 14th 1919

MONDAY, JUNE 9th, 1919

Arrests:- Mr. Michael O’Connell, Main Street, Thurles, was arrested and sent under strong escort to Cork Jail. The charge has not been mentioned.
Raids:- Three houses were raided at Thurles, Co. Tipperary. The five Railway Stations in Cork were raided by armed police, late at night, and searched.
Sentences;- Bryan Shanahan, Grantstown, Co. Tipperary, was sentenced to four months imprisonment for “being suspected of having an intention to commit an illegal act.” The evidence against Mr. Shanahan was that he answered police questions in Irish and had possession of the key of a house in which two Irish Volunteers Uniforms were kept. Dr. T.F. Higgins of Maryborough was sent to gaol for one month for failing to admit police to a Language Movement Concert.
Murder:- Mr. Matthew Murphy, shot on the 4th June by a sentry posted without notice outside Dundalk died of his wounds.  [read more …] “LEST WE FORGET (3)”

Lest We Forget (2)

LEST WE FORGET (2)

Continuing the series to commemorate centenary events of 1919 with the help of the First Dail’s newspaper, the Irish Bulletin. The Bulletin reported that from May 1916 to January 1919 the Crown Forces had carried out the following actions: 51 murders, 2,064 deportations, 99 assaults on civilians, 713 raids on houses, 4,785 arrests, 1,460 sentences, 51 proclamations and suppressions of meetings, fairs, markets etc., 28 newspapers suppressed and 322 court-martials. And of course these were for reported actions and not therefore complete. The following lists are samples of the weekly actions for the first weeks of May and June 1919. 

Detailed list of the Acts of Aggression committed against the Irish people by the British military forces in Ireland during the short period of the visit of the Irish-American Peace Delegation, which extended from

May 2nd to May 12th, 1919

N.B. In order not to disclose the real methods by which Ireland is held in subjection the English commanders in Ireland held their forces in some restraint during the period mentioned. The following list, therefore, though it  may surprise foreign peoples is not fully indicative of the tyranny which is practised from day to day upon the people of Ireland.  [read more …] “Lest We Forget (2)”

Lest We Forget (1)

In this decade of commemorations we are encouraged to remember and not to forget. Very good advice and we will do our bit during the hundredth anniversary of “the four glorious years” to recall the facts of those years. We will do so with the help of the “Irish Bulletin”, the daily paper of the Dáil.
There could not be a more appropriate source as the whole object of the War that Britain engaged in was to destroy that Dáil. This is history from the horse’s mouth.
People who set up the Bulletin published lists of atrocities before it was officially launched in November 1919 and did so afterwards as well. Below is a list for 1919 and early 1920. It is not all comprehensive as it relied to a large extent on newspaper reports which were all censored and dozens suppressed and before the Bulletin had established a network for receiving news of atrocities independent of the press. Later lists will show much more comprehensive listings for the period covered here.
However, it gives the flavour of the ongoing terror campaign in period it covers and confirms the “existing state of war” as described in the Dáil’s Declaration to the Free Nations of the World on 21 January 1919.

OUTSTANDING INCIDENTS OF ENGLISH AGGRESSION IN IRELAND

From January 1st 1919 to April 30th 1920
(In the majority of cases the dates given are those upon which the incidents were reported in the daily Press)

January 1919
7th People of Dunmanway, Co. Cork, attacked by soldiers and police with rifles, fixed bayonets and batons.
27th Police with fixed bayonets attacked a crowd at Baltinglass which had assembled to welcome home a political prisoner.

February 1919
11th Police forced doors of King’s County Council Offices and attacked Council staff with bayonets.
12th Patrick Gavin shot dead by soldiers at Curragh camp.
19th Soldiers attacked card party at the Temperance Hall at Annacarty, County Tipperary, and wrecked the Hall.
20th Timothy Connors, Greenane, Co. Tipperary, aged 11 years, kidnapped by police and secretly taken to unknown destination, his parents being refused all information.  [read more …] “Lest We Forget (1)”