Drishane Castle

drishane
Drishane Castle, Medieval Tower House with rounded corners built in 1450 by Dermot McCarthy, Lord of Munster

DATES, DAYS & TIMES (IN THAT ORDER)    WHEN THE PROPERTY IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

May 1st – Sept 30th    –   Daily   – 9-5 without appointment

Oct 1st – April 30th    –   Daily   – 9-5 with appointment

The lovely castle and grounds of Drishane are situated a little to the northeast of Millstreet, near where the Finnow river joins the Blackwater.

The castle is in fine condition, although not lived in.

The castle was built by the MacCarthys and the date given for its construction varies between 1436 and 1450

It seems likely that it was commenced by Dermot Mór, the second son of Teige the 3rd Lord of Muskerry, who was a direct descendant of Diarmuid, King of Cork.  Dermot also is said to have built Kilmeedy and Carrigaphooca in the great period in which his brother, Cormac Láidir, was building Blarney and Kilcrea.  Dermot died in 1448 and Drishane was probably completed by his son, another Dermot.

Drishane Castle from the Air
Drishane Castle from the Air (looking south)

The denealogy for the MacCarthy family in general is confusing, particularly since Christian names are so often repeated, but the account of the Drishane branch varies considerably in differing renderings.  For instance it is several times stated that there were two centenaries in the family, both named Donogh.  From a study of the documentation available – admittedly scanty at times – it seems likely that there may have been only one: the second Donogh, who is buried in the castle grounds and lived 1597 1719 to an age of 122 years.

Some authorities state that the first Donagh lived from 1517 – 1639.  Documentation clearly shows that Teige, son of Owen was in possession of the property in 1592 when he surrendered it to the Queen and got a re-grant. If Donagh was still alive he would, probably at least, have been the property owner.

Drishane Castle from the air (looking westwards)
Drishane Castle from the air (looking westwards)

Teige died before 1624, when there was an inquisition on his lands, and in a further inquisition of 1638, his son Owen Mac Teige is described as being in possession of Drishane Castle at his death in 1637.  The latter’s son, Donogh MacOwen, the centenarian, inherited.  He was over 40 at the time (which would confirm a birth date of 1597) and had married Kathleen Fitzgerald, who also died in 1637.  It would appear from other information that he married a second time.

Owen had brothers named Callaghan, Donogh and Phelim (on whom I have little information) as well as Dermot who was killed leading a squadron of horse at the battle of Knockbrack in 1652 – the end of resistance to the Parliament in the area.  Donogh mortgaged Carriphooca to Dominic Coppinger before 1641 – probably to raise funds for the Confederate War.

All MacCarthy lands were finally forfeited at the end of this tragic period, but were restored to the Earl of Clancarty, overall head of the family, on the restoration of Charles 11 in 1660.  He granted a lease in 1677 to Donogh: and this lease was passed  with the proviso that Donogh settled what was due to Coppinger.

The MacCarthy lands were finally forfeited following the Jacobite period of 1690 and Drishane fell into the hands of the Hollow Sword Blade Company, an organisation which had financed William’s campaign in Ireland.  In 1709 they sold to Henru Wallis of Ballyduff, Co Waterford, a younger son of Thomas of Curraglass (Mogeely), where the family had been resident since 1596.

There is some doubt also about the date of the first connection of Wallis with Drishane.  Renovations were carried out at the castle in 1643 according to the date on a fireplace, and this bears the inscription “W” suggesting “Wallis”.

It is further suggested that Wallis shared a friendship with Donagh MacCarthy, and that he allowed the latter to live in peace at Drishane during his lifetime.  Another account states that Donogh demised part of the land to Henry Wallis; and after Donogh eventually died in 1719 his widow, in 1722 and 1724, leased her interest in the remaining lands to Thomas Wallis, son of Henry.

Drishane Demese - The extent of the Drishane Lands c. 1840 (shaded grey). Stretching from the Blackwater river south to Tullig.
Drishane Demese - The extent of the Drishane Lands c. 1840 (shaded grey). Stretching from the Blackwater river south to Tullig. (Click the Image for a detailed view)

The Wallis’ turned Protestant and ‘discovered ‘ the property under the Property Act and so purchased what remained of Drishane for £450 (it was valued at £8000) in 1798.  This led to a horrendous local tradition that Donogh’s widow died on the doorstep of the castle from exposure, but in reality (since the exchange of cash was involved) the transaction may have been to clarify the entire matter because of claims being made by the widow’s relatives, the O’Learys, to the property.

By the time Doctor Smith wrote his History of Cork in 1750 he was recording that there as a handsome new house near the castle built by the late William Wallis who had considerably improved this part of the country, by manuring it with lime, enclosing planting etc.

In fact the Wallis’ appear to have been popular in the neighbourhood and remained there until 1882 when the estate was placed in Chancery on an application of insurance companies, and there it remained until 1912 when it was sold before Judge Roy to Patrick Stack of Fermoy from whom, through the offices of Cornelius Duggan of Cork, it was passed  to the Dames of Saint Maud, a French order of teaching nuns ( The Congregation of the Holy Child Jesus).
When the Drishane Sisters came to Drishane  they remainded there until c.1992 when the Estate was purchased by the Duggan Family.  Initially a hotel was envisaged.  The Kosovar people stayed there for a year.  Now people from various nations reside there.

Drishane Castle

Homepage

DATES, DAYS & TIMES (IN THAT ORDER)    WHEN THE PROPERTY IS OPEN TO THE PUBLICMay 1st – Sept 30th    –   Daily   – 9-5 without appointment

Oct 1st – April 30th    –   Daily   – 9-5 with appointment

The lovely castle and grounds of Drishane are situated a little to the northeast of Millstreet, near where the Finnow river joins the Blackwater.The castle is in fine condition, although not lived in.

The castle was built by the MacCarthys and the date given for its construction varies between 1436 and 1450

It seems likely that it was commenced by Dermot Mór, the second son of Teige the 3rd Lord of Muskerry, who was a direct descendant of Diarmuid, King of Cork.  Dermot also is said to have built Kilmeedy and Carrigaphooca in the great period in which his brother, Cormac Láidir, was building Blarney and Kilcrea.  Dermot died in 1448 and Drishane was probably completed by his son, another Dermot.

The denealogy for the MacCarthy family in general is confusing, particularly since Christian names are so often repeated, but the account of the Drishane branch varies considerably in differing renderings.  For instance it is several times stated that there were two centenaries in the family, both named Donogh.  From a study of the documentation available – admittedly scanty at times – it seems likely that there may have been only one: the second Donogh, who is buried in the castle grounds and lived 1597 1719 to an age of 122 years.

Some authorities state that the first Donagh lived from 1517 – 1639.  Documentation clearly shows that Teige, son of Owen was in possession of the property in 1592 when he surrendered it to the Queen and got a re-grant. If Donagh was still alive he would, probably at least, have been the property owner.

Teige died before 1624, when there was an inquisition on his lands, and in a further inquisition of 1638, his son Owen Mac Teige is described as being in possession of Drishane Castle at his death in 1637.  The latter’s son, Donogh MacOwen, the centenarian, inherited.  He was over 40 at the time (which would confirm a birth date of 1597) and had married Kathleen Fitzgerald, who also died in 1637.  It would appear from other information that he married a second time.

Owen had brothers named Callaghan, Donogh and Phelim (on whom I have little information) as well as Dermot who was killed leading a squadron of horse at the battle of Knockbrack in 1652 – the end of resistance to the Parliament in the area.  Donogh mortgaged Carriphooca to Dominic Coppinger before 1641 – probably to raise funds for the Confederate War.

All MacCarthy lands were finally forfeited at the end of this tragic period, but were restored to the Earl of Clancarty, overall head of the family, on the restoration of Charles 11 in 1660.  He granted a lease in 1677 to Donogh: and this lease was passed  with the proviso that Donogh settled what was due to Coppinger.

The MacCarthy lands were finally forfeited following the Jacobite period of 1690 and Drishane fell into the hands of the Hollow Sword Blade Company, an organisation which had financed William’s campaign in Ireland.  In 1709 they sold to Henru Wallis of Ballyduff, Co Waterford, a younger son of Thomas of Curraglass (Mogeely), where the family had been resident since 1596.

There is some doubt also about the date of the first connection of Wallis with Drishane.  Renovations were carried out at the castle in 1643 according to the date on a fireplace, and this bears the inscription “W” suggesting “Wallis”.

It is further suggested that Wallis shared a friendship with Donagh MacCarthy, and that he allowed the latter to live in peace at Drishane during his lifetime.  Another account states that Donogh demised part of the land to Henry Wallis; and after Donogh eventually died in 1719 his widow, in 1722 and 1724, leased her interest in the remaining lands to Thomas Wallis, son of Henry.

The Wallis’ turned Protestant and ‘discovered ‘ the property under the Property Act and so purchased what remained of Drishane for £450 (it was valued at £8000) in 1798.  This led to a horrendous local tradition that Donogh’s widow died on the doorstep of the castle from exposure, but in reality (since the exchange of cash was involved) the transaction may have been to clarify the entire matter because of claims being made by the widow’s relatives, the O’Learys, to the property.

By the time Doctor Smith wrote his History of Cork in 1750 he was recording that there as a handsome new house near the castle built by the late William Wallis who had considerably improved this part of the country, by manuring it with lime, enclosing planting etc.

In fact the Wallis’ appear to have been popular in the neighbourhood and remained there until 1882 when the estate was placed in Chancery on an application of insurance companies, and there it remained until 1912 when it was sold before Judge Roy to Patrick Stack of Fermoy from whom, through the offices of Cornelius Duggan of Cork, it was passed  to the Dames of Saint Maud, a French order of teaching nuns ( The Congregation of the Holy Child Jesus).

When the Drishane Sisters came to Drishane  they remainded there until c.1992 when the Estate was purchased by the Duggan Family.  Initially a hotel was envisaged.  The Kosovar people stayed there for a year.  Now people from various nations reside there.

12 thoughts on “Drishane Castle”

  1. I am researching battlements for a proposed restoration of a tower house near Cobh and wonder if I might be able to access Drishane’s roof in order to measure the battlements?

    I would be very grateful.

    Kind regards,

    Bena Stutchbury – 087 258 1844

  2. Dear Sir/Madam,
    Late last year, you permitted me to closely inspect and tour the ‘Keep Tower’. It was fasinating and I photographed it thoroughly. It is on a line of my family’s history as a home and it was a powerful emotional experience to be there. I had come from Australia it see it, and the Drishane Cemetery graves, Kilcrea Friary, it and other family history sights. Thank you for care and interest. Hunter Gill (Great Grandmother – Isabella McCarthy).

    1. When visiting our ancestral home,the Drishane Keep, we ventured over to the Drishane Cemetery on the edge of the estate and found ancestors from up to 700 years ago. I am concerned about the sizable tree growing inside the elevated grave. I will split the ancient Cormac McCarthy grave. Could this tree be poisoned and removed please? Maybe this has already being done? Descendant of Cormac McCarthy; Hunter Gill.

  3. In apprx 1963 when I was 7yr old child my father was carrying out some work on the Convent relating to woodworm/dry rot, the firm he worked for was called Biotox.
    Anyway my family were from Dublin and my dad arranged for my Mother myself and sister who was a few years older than me to stay in one of the groundsmen’s cottages with the family.
    The cottage if I can recall correctly was at the end of a lane which led to the convent,there was a lad from the cottage apprx the same age as myself maybe a bit older and we spent a lot of time fishing in the lake on the convent ground’s.
    I often think of that childhood Holiday and have to say was one of the best of my life,we would walk to the cinema in Millstreet in the evening and always run home at full speed past the graveyard.
    I often wondered what had become of the Convent, my dad had told me f a Lion or Tiger that was in the main hall, I don’t know if he was adding his ‘own bit on’ but said to have been shot by one of the nun’s years previously in some far off land where they had served..was wondering could anyone add to this ?

    1. Hello Donal,

      Thomas Duggan here – Drishane is now in our ownership (for the past 24 years in fact). The tiger is still in Millstreet but now in the Green Glens Arena, and yes he was shot on the grounds of a House of the Sisters in Malaysia once upon a time. My sisters went to boarding school there and I recall from a very early age the tiger in the hall – he was very scary looking.
      Drishane is currently accommodating Asylum Seekers and has been doing so since August 1998. It is a lovely place and is full of history with its connections with the past.
      The good news is that the work your Dad did worked ! There is no rot there now.
      The cottage you refer to is no longer there, it suffered a fire in its latter years and then was knocked.
      If you would like to walk down memory lane anytime in the future please feel free to do so, you will be very welcome.

      Best regards,

      Thomas Duggan

    2. Hi Donal,
      The family your dad stayed with were the McSweeneys,
      They lived in the lodge as you go down to the graveyard
      They had two in family Terence and Mary.
      I do remember as i was young at the time
      If you want any more info do contact me
      Regards Neil Cronin

  4. Hi! I am a McCarthy from Argentina. James McCarthy (b.1836 in England), son of Callaghan McCarthy (Millstreet, Cork County, Ireland) came to this country with his sons (Augustus Charles McCarthy my old grand father). It´s a pleasure for me to research all about my ancetors and I hope I will be visiting the castles and finding my roots and familiy for 2017.I like very much this page. Thank you!

  5. Hi, My mother was a Wallis, daughter of James Harold Wallis who is a direct descendant of the Wallis’ of Dishane. When I was a child my mother used to wax lyrical about the ‘Family Castle’ but reading the history here the Wallis’ claim on Drishane seems rather short-lived. Could you tell me how I might find out more about the Wallis’ contribution to the Castle?
    Thanks
    James Gilbert

    1. The Aubane Historical Society booklets have bits and pieces on the Wallis family of Drishane, as do lots of other pages on the internet. The below link lists out where they are mentioned:
      https://goo.gl/53QVP5

      Though I haven’t read it, there’s also a three page article in the 1962 “Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society” on the Wallis Family of Drishane, that might be a good place to look:

      The Wallis family of Drishane.
      Main Author: Wallis, Sheila
      Citation: Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society , Vol. LXVI, pp. 48-50, January-June, 1962
      Format: Journal Article
      Published: January-June, 1962

      It can be viewed in the National Library of Ireland (details: http://sources.nli.ie/Record/PS_UR_096043),

      or that back edition can be purchased from the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society for €12.50, details on their website corkhist.ie/journal/ under “Purchasing Back Issues and Indexes”.

  6. Hi, I went to school at Drishane Convent which was then a boarding school. I was wondering if you have had any past pupils contact your website? and if you could put me in touch with any past pupils, particularly the class of 1973?

  7. This post concerns photos I possess of Drishane , includes boarders and nuns , from 1924. My aunts attended during the 1920’s. As it happens they were McCarthys. My query really are photos from 1929 showing a hockey team visiting Kilrush Co.Clare and whether they depict a convent team. Does anyone know if hockey was a sport there in the 1920’s.
    Any pointers / help would be gratefully received.
    Anthony McCarthy.

    1. Dear Anthony,

      Unfortunately I cannot help you much regarding whether hockey was an active sport in Drishane in the 1920s, but i the photos are taken in Drishane at that time I would love to have a copy. We have a number of shots from different periods all of which reveal their own stories.

      Sincerely,

      Thomas Duggan

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *