21st Birthday of Clara News – May 1998

Front row – Eiblis McCarthy, Noreen Dennehy, Ann Cowman

Second row – Patrick Dennehy, Judy Reardon, Eily Buckley, Marian Buckley, Eileen Dinneem. Mary Guiney, Moira O’Keeffe

Back row – John O’Sullivan, Ml McCarthy, Colman Culhane, Denis Reardon, Dan Buckley, Cormac Dinneen, Patrick O’Keeffe, Jerry Buckley, Kathryn Tarrant, Donal Cowman, Donal Guiney

Rail Works at Millstreet Station in 1988

Yesterday, the Irish Railway Record Society posted a video of railway works at Millstreet and Charleville on their Facebook Page. The first minute and a half is from Millstreet Station. To reminisce on how it was 33 years ago., just click on THIS LINK to watch the video (I think that you may need to be logged into facebook to view it).  [read more …] “Rail Works at Millstreet Station in 1988”

100th Anniversary of the Killing of Frank Creedon

On the morning of Saturday July 2nd 1921, a blistering hot day, Constable Frank Creedon (originally from Adrivale) and nine other policemen were sent on patrol from Tallow Police Barracks, which they did every day. This was at the height of the War of Independence and tensions were high. Unfortunately for the patrol, the I.R.A. had been observing their movements, and it was noticed that their usual procedure was to take different roads on alternate days on departure from the town. With rifles and machine guns, the I.R.A. took up positions in the Old Military Barracks, and on an adjoining hill on the expectation that they would move out by a certain road. However, the patrol went by an adjoining road which did not exactly meet the positions the I.R.A. had taken up, but in haste they started firing from a distance. When the shooting ceased after about ten minutes, the ambush parties withdrew. Constable Francis Creedon lay dead, two more policemen wounded, while the remaining policemen had rushed into some adjoining houses and escaped the fire. Only nine days before the truce that ended the War of Independence. He was buried in darkness at Drishane Cemetery, and left behind a young wife and two+ small children.  Read more about what happened in our full article on him.

Mikie Dinneen, Murdered 100 years ago today at Tooreenbawn

In the aftermath of the Rathcoole ambush a week earlier, where two Auxiliaries were killed, and many wounded, the British forces conducted the biggest sweep of any area in the south of Ireland, looking for IRA suspects. Early on the morning of the 24th of June 1921 I.R.A. Volunteer Michael Dineen from the Kilcorney Company County Cork was taken from his brother’s house in Ivale, and shot in the back multiple times just 300m away.

The British Commandant instructed that no inquest was to take place as such action would have risked lives unnecessarily of local forces.

His funeral was probably the largest ever seen locally, and he was buried in Millstreet Church Graveyard (along the path, just down from the sacristy door).

Pictured above is the memorial at the site of his murder in Tooreenbawn.

For more information on Mikie Dineen, and what happened, we recommend these: [read more …] “Mikie Dinneen, Murdered 100 years ago today at Tooreenbawn”

George H.S. Duckham (1900-1921)

On June 22nd 1921, George H.S. Duckham, was returning to Millstreet from leave in London where he had been married just a week earlier. A young R.I.C. constable in Millstreet, he had rested in Macroom Barrack overnight, and was making his way in plain clothes on a horse and side-car to Millstreet. It was at the height of the war of Independence, and unfortunately for him, the IRA knew he was coming and they ambushed him between Macroom and Carriganima at Carriganeigh Cross. They took him prisoner and apparently found on him amongst other things, a list of the names of the members of the Millstreet Battalion Column that were to be shot on sight. On top of that, as a constable he apparently had a bad record in the eyes of the local republicans. He was tried by the IRA and shot. His body was left across the river from Carriganima Church, but apparently taken away and buried in a bog elsewhere by locals who were afraid that the police would cause trouble in the area. His body was never found and remains a mystery. He left behind a young wife and a young son, also named George Henry Samuel Duckham. Wherever his body lies, may he rest in peace.

He is one of four+ R.I.C. (two auxiliaries, two Black and Tans) that lost their lived in Millstreet during the War of Independence. Below are two reports on  his demise, and also as some details about his background: [read more …] “George H.S. Duckham (1900-1921)”

Rathcoole Ambush – 100 Years Ago Today

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the Rathcoole Ambush, one of the largest and most successful ambushes by the IRA during the War of Independence, which increased pressure on the British Empire to leave Ireland to the Irish..
The IRA laid landmines in the road, and detonated them as a convoy of Auxillaries passed over them, disabling two vehicles and trapping three more. Two auxiliaries, both only 20 years old, William A.H. Boyd, and Frederick Shorter were killed in the ambush, and many more injured.

Further Details of the ambush can be found in the article The Rathcoole Ambush – June 16th 1921

 

[read more …] “Rathcoole Ambush – 100 Years Ago Today”

Clonbanin Ambush Centenary Monument

The Clonbanin Ambush Centenary Monument (at Derrinagree Church) was completed today with the erection of two information boards. The board on the left tells the story of the Ambush and the board on the right contains the relevant maps outlining the routes the Volunteers travelled and the Ambush site. The committee would like to thank the following for the design and fabrication of the boards:

  • Seamus Buckley, SB2 Steelworks, Meenskehy,
  • Declan Crowley, Milltech Digital Printing, Cork.

Seeking an editor

I drafted a manuscript titled “100 Letters from Ireland” based on letters my grandmother Bella Murphy Barker wrote from 1922-1923 while she, my mother and aunt were visiting my great grandmother Jude Sugrue Murphy in Knocknaloman. I am seeking an editor to review the manuscript before I publish and I will gladly pay for the service.

The Tricolour is flying at the Clonbanin monument

The Tricolour is flying at the Clonbanin monument to commemorate the Centenary Anniversary of the Drishanebeg Train Ambush on the 11th February 1921.The Volunteers of the Millstreet Battalion IRA achieved a major  success over British forces by stopping and boarding the train, travelling from Mallow to Killarney,  and seizing rifles and ammunition from the troops on the train. The Volunteers had taken up positions at the Ambush site, on eight consecutive nights not knowing when they would be called into action.

Captain Cornelius Murphy: 1915-1921

In the last few days we have been asked for a little more information on Captain Con Murphy, whose 100th anniversary is today, and after whom Murphy’s Terrace in Millstreet was named. For this purpose, below is a detailed article on his active years, written by his great-grandniece as a special study for her Leaving Certificate a few years ago:

 

Captain Cornelius Murphy: 1915-1921
First Volunteer of the Irish Republican Army to be executed under Martial Law for possession of firearms.

In 1921 my great-granduncle, Captain Cornelius Murphy was the first to be executed by the British Firing Squad since the executions of the 1916 Easter Rising Leaders. He was also the first volunteer of the Irish Republican Army to be executed under Martial Law for possession of firearms.

His military career began in December 1915, when Con was appointed Officer Commanding of the Rathduane Company in Ballydaly which comprised of forty men. At the time this was under Tomas MacCurtain’s Cork Brigade of Irish Volunteers, in January 1919, this Company became part of Liam Lynch’s No. 2 Brigade. After the Easter Rising, 1916, the controversy surrounding the executions of the Rising Leaders had grown in intensity, and the Royal Irish Constabulary, (backed by the British Army) raided Ireland for signs of potential threat to English security. Con and his brother Denis were arrested in the aftermath of the Rising as part of a nationwide crackdown on prominent Republicans (more than one hundred men were captured in total). The Murphys arrived at Knutsford, Chesire on June 7th 1916. All the detainees were released in August of that year as the jail was shut down.  [read more …] “Captain Cornelius Murphy: 1915-1921”

Class from St Patrick’s College, Millstreet 1964 or maybe 1965

Seán Creedon originally from Rathmore sent in this picture and needs help with filling in the names.   Seán was born in  Gortnagown, which is the townland where the famous City is located and has been working in Dublin now for over 50 years.
Back row: L/r: Donie Hickey (Cullen), Seán Creedon (Rathmore),  Denis O’Connell (Cullen), Tim Burton (Millstreet area), John Hickey (Gneeveguilla).
Middle row: L/r. Garret Hickey, Principal; Tony Shine (Derrinagree), Derry Murphy (Rathmore), Denis Kane (Gneeveguilla), Pat Hickey (Rathmore), Denis McCarthy (Carriganima), Tony Gallagher (Millstreet). Con Kelleher, (Cloghoulabeg, Millstreet), and Joe Garvey (Teacher).
Front row: L/r. T. C. Buckley (Millstreet area), Mick Hickey (Rathmore), Jerry Dennehy (Cullen),   Con O’Connor (Millstreet area), Murty O’Sullivan, RIP (Cullen), Pat Buckley (Millstreet) Leo (?) O’Leary (Millstreet), Jerry O’Riordan (Millstreet area), Donie O’Leary (Rathmore).
We thank Jerry O’Riordan of Ballinatona, Millstreet for helping to further identify the remainder of the names from this most interesting Coláiste Pádraig photograph from the mid 1960s.   Jerry’s extra identifications are in red print.  Jerry himself is one of the Class Members.  We thank Seán Creedon for providing the original image and we are very glad to be able to fill in the blanks from the original picture….And sincere thanks to Hannelie for uploading the feature.  (S.R.)

Centenary Remembrance

The Tricolour is flying at half mast at the Clonbanin monument to commemorate and remember the tragic events of the 21st November 1920 in Croke Park, when British soldiers opened fire at a Tipperary v Dublin football match resulting in 14 innocent civilians being killed.                                                                                                                                                     We also remember Volunteer Paddy McCarthy, Meelin, who was shot dead by Black and Tan forces on the 22nd November,1920 at Mill Lane, Millstreet, Co Cork.

Centenary Anniversary of Terence McSwiney

The Tricolour is flying at half mast at the Clonbanin monument, to honour the memory of Terence McSwiney, Lord Mayor of Cork, who died on hunger strike in Brixton prison, England on this day 25th October 1920. We also remember Commandant Michael Fitzgerald and Volunteer Joseph Murphy who died on hunger strike in Cork prison on 17th October and  and 25th October respectively, during the War of Independence

Walsh family tree

I was wondering if someone might please be able to help me?

My name is Helen Sagan and I live in Australia. I understand it is not your job to do family history research for anyone who might happen to ask, but I am looking for some very specific local history information regarding the Rockite movement of 1822 and I thought you might best be able to assist or direct me.

I am researching my husbands Walsh family tree, on the Kerry side of the Blackwater, in-fact I visited your library back in 2011 and spent many pleasant hours looking through the Casey Collection.

At present I am investigating two brothers Healy, Tadj(Timothy?) and Liam(William?) that were executed on 10th August 1822 (along with 3 others) and have their names inscribed upon a monument erected at Shinnagh Cross, Rathmore. I believe these brothers to be my husband’s  Uncles and would sincerely love more information on them.

Most recently I discovered the Duchas School books (a truly marvellous & enlightening collection!) which introduced me to tales of old local people during the 1930’s, recalling stories their grandparents would have told them, some about the Whiteboy uprising and precisely the 1822 murder of William Brereton and the subsequent events that resulted in and around Rathmore.

 

 

 

[read more …] “Walsh family tree”

The Tricolour is flying on Clonbanin and Derrygallon Monuments

 

The Tricolour is flying on Clonbanin and Derrygallon Monuments in memory of 2 IRA Volunteers, Paddy Clancy and Jack O Connell, who were both shot dead by British forces on the 16th August 1920 during the War of Independence

[read more …] “The Tricolour is flying on Clonbanin and Derrygallon Monuments”

A very old picture from 1960s

Tap on the image to enlarge.

A very old picture from 1960s…my uncle is far right Garry Murphy Prohous…and far left is Ger Cronin Killoween. ..Could the public identify the others? …Paddy Sullivan.  (Two further people whom I can identify are Mrs. Kelleher who owned the Public Bar near Reen’s Pharmacy in Main Street, Millstreet – a true lady and at the centre is the very well known John “Sing” O’Sullivan  …. Many thanks, Paddy, for sharing such an interesting image on our website …. And we thank Frank Reen and Bernie O’Rahilly (née Murphy) for just now sharing in our Comments Forum their truly comprehensive captions to the superb photograph….Seán Radley.)

Lest We Forget (20) – March 29th – April 10th, 1920

Continuing our series on the events of 1920 with the help of the daily newspaper of the First Dáil, the Irish Bulletin.

LEST WE FORGET (20)

The following are the Acts of Aggression Committed in Ireland by the armed Military and Police of the Usurping English Government – as reported in the Daily Press, for the Week ending APRIL 3rd, 1920:

The sentences passed on political offenders during the above five days, totalled 9 years.

MONDAY, MARCH 29th, 1920

Raids:– Armed military forcibly entered over a score of private residences in Dublin in the early hours of the morning, searching every room and perusing the private correspondence of the occupiers. In many cases the residents were arrested. Among the houses visited were those of Mr. Laurence Ginnell, Member of Parliament for Westmeath, Mr. Philip Shanahan, Member of Parliament for the Clontarf division of Dublin City, Mr. Charles Murphy, recently elected Alderman of the Dublin Corporation, and Mr. T. J. Loughlin recently elected Councillor of the same body. At Carrick-on-Suir five houses were raided by police. At Thurles, Co. Tipperary eight houses were raided by armed police. In other parts of Ireland, Bandon, Clonakilty and Fermoy, Co. Cork, Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh, Strabane, Co. Tyrone, Gort, Co. Galway, Tralee, Co. Kerry, Listowel, Co. Kerry, and at Belfast City. Over 100 private houses were similarly raided.   [read more …] “Lest We Forget (20) – March 29th – April 10th, 1920”

The Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919 – How it affected Millstreet

During this Covid-19 pandemic, it has often been compared to the Influenza Pandemic of 1918/1919. We were wondering how it affected this area, so we delved into the records to try to figure it out.

Surprisingly, what we found was that there was no big spike in deaths locally at that time compared to the surrounding years (see the graph below **). So we though that maybe it didn’t affect the Millstreet area at all … but we were wrong.

When we looked at the case by case influenza and pneumonia figures (flu was often misdiagnosed as pneumonia) in the death registers, we saw that around March 1919, there was a big jump in numbers when about 20 died from flu and pneumonia. This coincided with what was referred to as the third wave of that pandemic in Ireland, and is easily seen by the yellow spike in the graph below. The smaller orange spike (November 1918) also coincided with the second wave of the pandemic in Ireland.

In total, we think about 30 people died locally died from it over the duration of that pandemic.

Some families here got destroyed by it … Twomeys of Islandhill lost 3 in a week, Sullivans of Umeraboy lost three in a month, Butlers of Liscahane lost two in a fortnight. The one very surprising thing  though is that most of the deaths were people that died locally were in their 20’s and 30’s, which we were unaware of but was a feature of that disease.

If that many died in the spring of 1919, then about 1,000 must have been infected locally at the time. That’s a lot of sick people.

Below we first look at the disease in Ireland, and also we break down the death registers to see those that died from it locally, when they got it, and where they were from: [read more …] “The Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919 – How it affected Millstreet”

The Muskerry Bard

Come boys pledge a toast in a bumper most bright,
To the men who lie fettered in prison to-night.
Condemned by packed juries and perjurers base,
But there is one beyond all who is worthy of praise.
He who spoke through his rifle wherever he went,
That renowned legislator for lowering the rent.
For moral force theories could never accord,
With the noble desires of this patriot Bard.

Near the Muskerry mountains he first drew his breath,
And imbibed the pure air of his dear native heath.
And e’er he had grown to the age of a man,
To battle for freedom he bravely began.
Though England’s proud warriors may boast of their skill,
Their fleets and their armies, discipline and drill.
Far dearer to me was the Volunteer Guard,
That obeyed the command of the Muskerry Bard.

He defeated for years, all the limbs of the law,
And for daring and pluck struck each deepest with awe.
And the threat of his name spoken ever so tender,
Had made the most mean-hearted grabber surrender.
Twenty five times at least in the dock did he stand,
And was never betrayed by his brave hearted band.
Though often was offered a bounteous reward,
For a member to swear on this chivalrous Bard  [read more …] “The Muskerry Bard”

Kennedy Home Shot-At Because Son Joined The Dublin Police

11th May 1920, Millstreet, Cork: As the IRA’s campaign against the RIC escalates, policemen’s families become increasingly easy targets. In Millstreet, the home of John Kennedy, an elderly ex-RIC man, is shot at. Kennedy’s son, John, had recently joined the Dublin Metropolitan Police”

The shots were likely more intimidatory in nature as opposed to attempted murder, and we might never know what exactly happened! The boycott of police was coming into its height at the time, and anything to ward off Irish men from joining the police was carried out. It didn’t drive out the family though, as they lived here for at least another ten years … but who were the Kennedys? Below, we try to explain where they came from and and what happened to them: [read more …] “Kennedy Home Shot-At Because Son Joined The Dublin Police”

Lest We Forget (19) – March 22nd-27th 1920

LEST WE FORGET (19)
The Following are the Acts of Aggression Committed in Ireland by the armed forces of the usurping English Government — as reported in the Daily Press — for the week ending MARCH 27th, 1920.
Summary:

The Sentences passed for political offences during the above six days totalled 6 years, 8 months, and 2 weeks.

MONDAY, MARCH 22nd, 1920

RAIDS:- In the course of a military “drive” through West Kerry, police and military raided upward of twenty houses. An extensive police and military raid was carried out on the premises of Mr. James O’Meara, Connaught Street, Athlone, Co. Westmeath. The flooring of the bedrooms was taken up and considerable damage done to the interior fittings of the house. Police and military raided the houses of the following persons in Monaghan:- Prof. O’Duffy; Messrs. C.A. Emerson; G. McEneany; J.E. McCabe; J. McDonald; P.J. McCann; and D. Horgan.
Four private houses were raided in South Kilkenny by military and police. Police and military raided a house at Wood Quay, Galway, and searched the rooms of a Catholic Priest who [was] staying in the house.  [read more …] “Lest We Forget (19) – March 22nd-27th 1920”