Class from St Patrick’s College, Millstreet 1964 or maybe 1965

Seán Creedon originally from Rathmore sent in this picture and needs help with filling in the names.   Seán was born in  Gortnagown, which is the townland where the famous City is located and has been working in Dublin now for over 50 years.
Back row: L/r: Donie Hickey (Cullen), Seán Creedon (Rathmore),  Denis O’Connell (Cullen), Tim Burton (Millstreet area), John Hickey (Gneeveguilla).
Middle row: L/r. Garret Hickey, Principal; Tony Shine (Derrinagree), Derry Murphy (Rathmore), Denis Kane (Gneeveguilla), Pat Hickey (Rathmore), Denis McCarthy (Carriganima), Tony Gallagher (Millstreet). Con Kelleher, (Cloghoulabeg, Millstreet), and Joe Garvey (Teacher).
Front row: L/r. T. C. Buckley (Millstreet area), Mick Hickey (Rathmore), Jerry Dennehy (Cullen),   Con O’Connor (Millstreet area), Murty O’Sullivan, RIP (Cullen), Pat Buckley (Millstreet) Leo (?) O’Leary (Millstreet), Jerry O’Riordan (Millstreet area), Donie O’Leary (Rathmore).
We thank Jerry O’Riordan of Ballinatona, Millstreet for helping to further identify the remainder of the names from this most interesting Coláiste Pádraig photograph from the mid 1960s.   Jerry’s extra identifications are in red print.  Jerry himself is one of the Class Members.  We thank Seán Creedon for providing the original image and we are very glad to be able to fill in the blanks from the original picture….And sincere thanks to Hannelie for uploading the feature.  (S.R.)

Centenary Remembrance

The Tricolour is flying at half mast at the Clonbanin monument to commemorate and remember the tragic events of the 21st November 1920 in Croke Park, when British soldiers opened fire at a Tipperary v Dublin football match resulting in 14 innocent civilians being killed.                                                                                                                                                     We also remember Volunteer Paddy McCarthy, Meelin, who was shot dead by Black and Tan forces on the 22nd November,1920 at Mill Lane, Millstreet, Co Cork.

Centenary Anniversary of Terence McSwiney

The Tricolour is flying at half mast at the Clonbanin monument, to honour the memory of Terence McSwiney, Lord Mayor of Cork, who died on hunger strike in Brixton prison, England on this day 25th October 1920. We also remember Commandant Michael Fitzgerald and Volunteer Joseph Murphy who died on hunger strike in Cork prison on 17th October and  and 25th October respectively, during the War of Independence

Walsh family tree

I was wondering if someone might please be able to help me?

My name is Helen Sagan and I live in Australia. I understand it is not your job to do family history research for anyone who might happen to ask, but I am looking for some very specific local history information regarding the Rockite movement of 1822 and I thought you might best be able to assist or direct me.

I am researching my husbands Walsh family tree, on the Kerry side of the Blackwater, in-fact I visited your library back in 2011 and spent many pleasant hours looking through the Casey Collection.

At present I am investigating two brothers Healy, Tadj(Timothy?) and Liam(William?) that were executed on 10th August 1822 (along with 3 others) and have their names inscribed upon a monument erected at Shinnagh Cross, Rathmore. I believe these brothers to be my husband’s  Uncles and would sincerely love more information on them.

Most recently I discovered the Duchas School books (a truly marvellous & enlightening collection!) which introduced me to tales of old local people during the 1930’s, recalling stories their grandparents would have told them, some about the Whiteboy uprising and precisely the 1822 murder of William Brereton and the subsequent events that resulted in and around Rathmore.

 

 

 

[read more …] “Walsh family tree”

The Tricolour is flying on Clonbanin and Derrygallon Monuments

 

The Tricolour is flying on Clonbanin and Derrygallon Monuments in memory of 2 IRA Volunteers, Paddy Clancy and Jack O Connell, who were both shot dead by British forces on the 16th August 1920 during the War of Independence

[read more …] “The Tricolour is flying on Clonbanin and Derrygallon Monuments”

A very old picture from 1960s

Tap on the image to enlarge.

A very old picture from 1960s…my uncle is far right Garry Murphy Prohous…and far left is Ger Cronin Killoween. ..Could the public identify the others? …Paddy Sullivan.  (Two further people whom I can identify are Mrs. Kelleher who owned the Public Bar near Reen’s Pharmacy in Main Street, Millstreet – a true lady and at the centre is the very well known John “Sing” O’Sullivan  …. Many thanks, Paddy, for sharing such an interesting image on our website …. And we thank Frank Reen and Bernie O’Rahilly (née Murphy) for just now sharing in our Comments Forum their truly comprehensive captions to the superb photograph….Seán Radley.)

Lest We Forget (20) – March 29th – April 10th, 1920

Continuing our series on the events of 1920 with the help of the daily newspaper of the First Dáil, the Irish Bulletin.

LEST WE FORGET (20)

The following are the Acts of Aggression Committed in Ireland by the armed Military and Police of the Usurping English Government – as reported in the Daily Press, for the Week ending APRIL 3rd, 1920:

The sentences passed on political offenders during the above five days, totalled 9 years.

MONDAY, MARCH 29th, 1920

Raids:– Armed military forcibly entered over a score of private residences in Dublin in the early hours of the morning, searching every room and perusing the private correspondence of the occupiers. In many cases the residents were arrested. Among the houses visited were those of Mr. Laurence Ginnell, Member of Parliament for Westmeath, Mr. Philip Shanahan, Member of Parliament for the Clontarf division of Dublin City, Mr. Charles Murphy, recently elected Alderman of the Dublin Corporation, and Mr. T. J. Loughlin recently elected Councillor of the same body. At Carrick-on-Suir five houses were raided by police. At Thurles, Co. Tipperary eight houses were raided by armed police. In other parts of Ireland, Bandon, Clonakilty and Fermoy, Co. Cork, Enniskillen, Co. Fermanagh, Strabane, Co. Tyrone, Gort, Co. Galway, Tralee, Co. Kerry, Listowel, Co. Kerry, and at Belfast City. Over 100 private houses were similarly raided.   [read more …] “Lest We Forget (20) – March 29th – April 10th, 1920”

The Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919 – How it affected Millstreet

During this Covid-19 pandemic, it has often been compared to the Influenza Pandemic of 1918/1919. We were wondering how it affected this area, so we delved into the records to try to figure it out.

Surprisingly, what we found was that there was no big spike in deaths locally at that time compared to the surrounding years (see the graph below **). So we though that maybe it didn’t affect the Millstreet area at all … but we were wrong.

When we looked at the case by case influenza and pneumonia figures (flu was often misdiagnosed as pneumonia) in the death registers, we saw that around March 1919, there was a big jump in numbers when about 20 died from flu and pneumonia. This coincided with what was referred to as the third wave of that pandemic in Ireland, and is easily seen by the yellow spike in the graph below. The smaller orange spike (November 1918) also coincided with the second wave of the pandemic in Ireland.

In total, we think about 30 people died locally died from it over the duration of that pandemic.

Some families here got destroyed by it … Twomeys of Islandhill lost 3 in a week, Sullivans of Umeraboy lost three in a month, Butlers of Liscahane lost two in a fortnight. The one very surprising thing  though is that most of the deaths were people that died locally were in their 20’s and 30’s, which we were unaware of but was a feature of that disease.

If that many died in the spring of 1919, then about 1,000 must have been infected locally at the time. That’s a lot of sick people.

Below we first look at the disease in Ireland, and also we break down the death registers to see those that died from it locally, when they got it, and where they were from: [read more …] “The Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1919 – How it affected Millstreet”

The Muskerry Bard

Come boys pledge a toast in a bumper most bright,
To the men who lie fettered in prison to-night.
Condemned by packed juries and perjurers base,
But there is one beyond all who is worthy of praise.
He who spoke through his rifle wherever he went,
That renowned legislator for lowering the rent.
For moral force theories could never accord,
With the noble desires of this patriot Bard.

Near the Muskerry mountains he first drew his breath,
And imbibed the pure air of his dear native heath.
And e’er he had grown to the age of a man,
To battle for freedom he bravely began.
Though England’s proud warriors may boast of their skill,
Their fleets and their armies, discipline and drill.
Far dearer to me was the Volunteer Guard,
That obeyed the command of the Muskerry Bard.

He defeated for years, all the limbs of the law,
And for daring and pluck struck each deepest with awe.
And the threat of his name spoken ever so tender,
Had made the most mean-hearted grabber surrender.
Twenty five times at least in the dock did he stand,
And was never betrayed by his brave hearted band.
Though often was offered a bounteous reward,
For a member to swear on this chivalrous Bard  [read more …] “The Muskerry Bard”

Kennedy Home Shot-At Because Son Joined The Dublin Police

11th May 1920, Millstreet, Cork: As the IRA’s campaign against the RIC escalates, policemen’s families become increasingly easy targets. In Millstreet, the home of John Kennedy, an elderly ex-RIC man, is shot at. Kennedy’s son, John, had recently joined the Dublin Metropolitan Police”

The shots were likely more intimidatory in nature as opposed to attempted murder, and we might never know what exactly happened! The boycott of police was coming into its height at the time, and anything to ward off Irish men from joining the police was carried out. It didn’t drive out the family though, as they lived here for at least another ten years … but who were the Kennedys? Below, we try to explain where they came from and and what happened to them: [read more …] “Kennedy Home Shot-At Because Son Joined The Dublin Police”

Lest We Forget (19) – March 22nd-27th 1920

LEST WE FORGET (19)
The Following are the Acts of Aggression Committed in Ireland by the armed forces of the usurping English Government — as reported in the Daily Press — for the week ending MARCH 27th, 1920.
Summary:

The Sentences passed for political offences during the above six days totalled 6 years, 8 months, and 2 weeks.

MONDAY, MARCH 22nd, 1920

RAIDS:- In the course of a military “drive” through West Kerry, police and military raided upward of twenty houses. An extensive police and military raid was carried out on the premises of Mr. James O’Meara, Connaught Street, Athlone, Co. Westmeath. The flooring of the bedrooms was taken up and considerable damage done to the interior fittings of the house. Police and military raided the houses of the following persons in Monaghan:- Prof. O’Duffy; Messrs. C.A. Emerson; G. McEneany; J.E. McCabe; J. McDonald; P.J. McCann; and D. Horgan.
Four private houses were raided in South Kilkenny by military and police. Police and military raided a house at Wood Quay, Galway, and searched the rooms of a Catholic Priest who [was] staying in the house.  [read more …] “Lest We Forget (19) – March 22nd-27th 1920”

Nicholas Pomeroy – American Civil War Veteran

Nicholas Pomeroy in a photo from c.1900

Nicholas Pomeroy is one of only two veterans of the American Civil War buried in County Cork. In fact, he is buried beside the Church in Millstreet. Here is a short overview of his story:

Nicholas Pomeroy was born about 1835 at Claramore to Robert Pomeroy and Harriet Justice. He was one of six children. His father worked hard on the farm and the family were brought up very respectably. Time passed, and the children went to school and when his older brother Tom got old enough to travel, he went out to a relation of his father’s in Missouri. When Nicholas was old enough, he followed around the end of 1858 in order to make a living.

As time passed, he got bored, and decided he wanted to see more of the world. So in October 1860 first visited his brother Tom in Ray County, and from there headed to St. Louis and took a steamboat down the Mississippi to New Orleans, where he had a nice time for a few days. From there he crossed the Gulf of Mexico to Galveston, Texas, and then onto Houston where he found employment.

There he fell into the ways of the local people, and their manners and customs became natural to him, and he liked the people and the weather and the nature around him very much, and life was uneventful.

But in Spring 1861, war was brewing, the southerners blood was up and Nicholas was ready for an adventure, and at the end of April 1861 he volunteered to fight for the Confederates at Houston. There they trained in a camp for several months before setting out for the seat of war in Virginia, and it was two months before they arrived at the Potomac River, facing the Federal Army across the river.

There was no fighting due to the winter. The army was reorganised, but and the biggest problem was to get enough food, heat, and shelter until the following Spring, when the action started. Many got sick at this time.

Here is a brief overview of the places that Nicholas saw action during the war as part of Company A 5th Regiment Texas Infantry:

  • Yorktown and coming to Magruder’s Assistance (April 1862)
  • The retreat from Yorktown and The Battle of Eltham’s Landing (May 3rd 1862)
  • The Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks (31st May-1st June 1862)
  • The Relief of Richmond and the Battle of Gaines’ Mill (Battle of Chickahominy River) (June 27, 1862)
  • Battle of Malvern Hill (1st July 1862)
  • The Second Battle of Bull Run or Battle of Second Manassas (August 28–30, 1862)
  • The Battle of Antietam (the Battle of Sharpsburg) September 17, 1862
  • The Battle of Fredericksburg (December 11–15, 1862)
  • The Battle of Gettysburg (July 1st-3rd, 1863). There he was shot twice: “at last I was struck by a bullet that glanced along my tight side tearing the flesh and lacerating my ribs, and at the same instant one passed through the lower joint of my little finger of my right hand. Though the wound in my side was not serious, it was very painful and I had great difficulty in breathing for quite a while”.  He was taken prisoner that day July 2nd  and sent to Fort McHenry (or Fort Delaware?). He met a man there who knew his brother Tom, and he told Nicholas that Tom had died accidentally. On July 31st he was  of the month he was paroled in a prisoner exchange.
  • Furlough – After his release he was given leave for 30 days, which really didn’t seem like very much.
  • Campaigning in Tennessee, where he got very sick with fever/malaria  in November 1863
  • The Battle of the Wilderness (May 5–7, 1864)
  • The Battle of Spotsylvania (May 1864)
  • The Siege of Petersburg (June 1864 to April 1865)
  • He surrendered with the remnants of General Lee’s army at Appomattox on April 9th 1865.

[read more …] “Nicholas Pomeroy – American Civil War Veteran”

Lest We Forget (18): March 15th-21st 1920

Continuing our series on the events of 1920 with the help of the daily newspaper of the First Dail, the Irish Bulletin.

LEST WE FORGET (18)

The Following are the Acts of Aggression Committed in Ireland by the armed forces of the Usurping English Government — as reported in the Daily Press — for the week ending MARCH 20th, 1920.

MONDAY, 15th MARCH, 1920.

RAIDS: A large military force surrounded the residence at Glasnevin, Dublin, of Mr. J. Forrestal, recently elected Member of the Dublin Corporation, and ineffectually tried to open the front door with a bunch of keys which they carried for that purpose. Upon being subsequently admitted they ransacked the entire building, including the nursery where three young children slept, and the sick room in which Mrs. Forrestal lay ill. Police and military raided the residence of Mr. T.J. Loughlin, 32 Lindsay Road, Dublin, and remained for over two hours, during which time they conducted a thorough search. A police party raided the shop of Mr. D. Curtain, Paradise Place, Cork, and seized copies of Republican newspapers. The residence of Mr. J. O’Sullivan, 13 Kyle Street, Cork, was raised by police. Mr. J. Hurley’s house at St. Mary’s Terrace, Cork, was also raided.

ARRESTS: In the course of a military and police raid on the house of Mr. T.J. Loughlin, Lindsay Road, Dublin, the raiders, after intimating that they had instructions to arrest every man in the house, took into custody Mr. Loughlin — who is over 60 and in failing health — and his son, Joseph, aged 15. Mr. Loughlin has no connection with any political organisation, and his son is still attending school. [read more …] “Lest We Forget (18): March 15th-21st 1920”

Lest We Forget (17) – March 1st-13th, 1920

Continuing our series on the events of 1920 with the help of the daily newspaper of the First Dail, the Irish Bulletin.

LEST WE FORGET (17)

The following are Acts of Aggression committed in Ireland by the armed Military and Police of the English Government, as reported in the Daily Press for the Week Ending March 6th, 1920

A new element has entered into the armed suppression of the Republican Movement in Ireland. Troops and police are now encouraged to wreck the property of well-known Republicans. In the foregoing week seven such incidents have occurred, these are usually accompanied by looting on the part of the troops. These occurrences appear under the heading “Sabotage”. In the above six days the sentences passed for political offences totalled one year and ten months.

MONDAY, MARCH 1st, 1920.
Raids:- Military and police in large numbers raided and searched upwards of 100 houses in the Rushbrook district of Co. Cork. At Dublin, in the early hours of the morning, military and police accompanied by armoured cars raided the residences of many prominent Republicans. Some twenty houses were searched including those of Mr. Robert O’Brennan, of the Rathmines Urban Council. Dr. Kathleen Lynn, – Member of the Rathmines Urban Council. In the raid on Mr. O’Brennan’s house the troops ordered Mrs. O’Brennan out of bed and when she subsequently asked them not to raid the rooms in which her three young children were sleeping the officer in charge replied “we can’t help that” and ordered the room be searched. In a raid upon the residence of Mrs. Hazlewood, that lady fainted and when an effort was made by a Mr. O’Brien who lodged in the same house to go to her assistance he was held up by the troops who ordered him at the point of the revolver to stand back. (See Military Sabotage). Military and police raided ten houses in the Kildorrery district of Co. Cork. In the Ballingar district of Co. Galway twenty five houses were raided and searched by armed police. Military and police raided the Labour Hall at Inchicore, Co. Dublin.  [read more …] “Lest We Forget (17) – March 1st-13th, 1920”

A Great Opportunity to Create a Time Capsule


This is a great opportunity for families to get creative and work as historians!

A time capsule is a historic cache of goods or information, usually intended as a deliberate method of communication with future people, and to help future archaeologists, anthropologists, or historians.

[read more …] “A Great Opportunity to Create a Time Capsule”

Patrick Flynn, Constable R.I.C. (Coolykerane P.P. 1911)

One of three men named Flynn (all of different families) that were constables in the Millstreet area at the same time around 1911, Patrick Flynn was only briefly sent to the Protection Post at Coolykeerane from his base in Macroom, and happened to be there when the Nominal Returns were filled out at the start of 1911.  In any event he was in Macroom in 1910, and back there again for the census of April 1911.
Son of a farmer from near  Ballymacarbry in Waterford, his time in the force was only ten years, spent in Cork West, Down, Limerick and finally Cork East, before he resigned in 918 to the home farm, luckily avoiding the troubles that were to come.  [read more …] “Patrick Flynn, Constable R.I.C. (Coolykerane P.P. 1911)”

Benjamin Jenkinson, Constable RIC (Millstreet c.1911)

Constable Benjamin Jenkinson (#53887) spent a little time in the Millstreet around 1911. He was noted at the Coolykerane Protection Post, near the Railway Station in Millstreet in the Nominal Returns for January 1911, and also is there also for the 1911 Census. A native of Antrim and Galway, he was unusual for the time, he was Protestant, and married to a Catholic lady Sarah Williams from Kanturk where he had been stationed initially. As well as Kanturk, he had spells as a policeman in Rosscarbery and Macroom. The family settled in the Coolcower area, east of Macroom where they brought up their eight children. Benjamin died in 1946 at his daughters residence on the Commons Road.

====

Service History [1]
53887 Benjamin Jenkinson
Joined: 20yrs
Height: 5’10” 1/2
Native of: Galway W, Antrim
Religion: Protestant
Married: 6/Feb/1897
Wife’s County: Cork E.R.
Recommended by: D.I. Fleury
Trade: none
Appointed: 23 July 89
Allocations: Cork E.R 11/Feb/90, Cork W.R. 1/3/97
Punishments Un.Res 2/6/92; f10/= 4/4/95; F10/= 9/1/04
Reason for Leaving: Pensioned 13/3/1915
Gratuity to Family if deceased W/P. RIC 1/307/1 (TODO: what does this mean?)

====

Nominal Return Books
(Station list at the start of each year)

1910 Dooneen PP
1911 Macroom

====

Pensioned off in 1915

In 1915, Benjamin was pensioned off at the age of 45, after 25 years. Payment of the pension for the first number of years at least was from the post office in Macroom where they lived.

25+ years service (on retirement)
53887 Cork W.R Jenkinson Benjamin Constable 45 yrs, 25yrs 7mo in force, pay:£80:12; average £70.15.1; Award of board £42.9.0; date as 13.3.1915 (on retirement)

53887 Jenkinson, Benjamin, Cork W.R., Pensioned [July 1915 Constabulary list]

Pension Leger 1919-1923 – paid at Macroom
Pension Leger 1915-1919 – paid at Macroom

TODO: when did they move to Cork?

====

Petty Session cases he brought that made the papers:

1890 Kanturk – Drunk and Disorderly

1904 Roscarbery – After hours drinking

1908 Roscarbery – suicide

1910 Macroom  – Drunk and Disorderly

1911 Macroom – theft of a horse

He does not appear in the petty session books after 1890 as they seem to have been destroyed.

====

Family Details of Benjamin Jenkinson

Birth of Benjamin Jenkinson at Tohermore, Tuam on October 20th 1868; to Anne Jenkinson (Flemming) and Henry Jemkinson a Steward.

Birth of Sarah Williams of Newmarket on January 16th 1874, to Hannah Williams (Brown) and George Williams a shopkeeper, Johanna Healy Newmarket present at birth. The oldest child of ten [parent’s marriage]

Marriage of Benjamin Jenkinson and Sarah Williams at Newmarket Church on February 6th 1897 by Richard Ahern (RCC); He an RIC constable from Newmarket, son of Henry Jenkinson a farmer; She a bar maid of Kilbrin, daughter of George Williams a baker; in the presence of Stephen Crowley and Katie Kearny
Q: Jenkinson was a Protestant … how were they married in a Catholic Church?

Wife: Sarah Williams (1874–1963)

Children:
Birth of HENRY JENKINSON in 1897, Shinnagh (Rathmore, Co. Kerry)  d.1987 Cork
Birth of GEORGE JENKINSON on 15 March 1900, Macroom. d.1982 Cork
Birth of ANNIE JENKINSON on 10 May 1901, Macroom. d.1913 Macroom
Birth of JAMES JENKINSON on 21 February 1903, Macroom. d.1970 NY
Birth of WILLIAM JENKINSON on 18 July 1905, Clonakilty. Died 1908 in Clonakilty
Birth of EDWARD JENKINSON on 16 March 1908, Clonakilty. d.1988 Newmarket
Birth of BENJAMIN JENKINSON on 24 May 1909, Clonakilty. d.1992 Glanmire
Birth of HANNA JENKINSON on 11 January 1913, Macroom. d.2002 Cork
Birth of RICHARD JENKINSON on 21 February 1915, Macroom. d.2005 Cork

1901 census: Residents of a house 9 in Carrigadrohid (Aghinagh, Cork)

Surname Forename Age Sex
Born
Relation to head Religion
Jenkinson Benjamin 31 Male
Co. Galway
Head of Family Episcopalian Irish Church
Jenkinson Sarah 26 Female
Co. Cork
Wife Roman Catholic
Jenkinson Henry John 3 Male
Co. Kerry
Son Roman Catholic
Jenkinson George 1 Male
Co. Cork
Son Episcopalian Irish Church
Williams George 10 Male
Co. Cork
Brother in Law Roman Catholic

 

1911 census:  Residents of a house 1000 in Coolykeerane (Coomlogane, Cork)
The ‘I’ initial is an incorrect transcription on the census website. It should read ‘J’, which correlates with the Nominal Return Books

Surname Fore
name
Age Sex Birth
Occupation
Religion
C
(Martin Cahill?)
M 55 Male Co. Clare
farmer’s son
R Catholic
married
I J
(Benjamin Jenkinson)
B 42 Male Co. Galway
Clerk
C of Ireland
married

1911 census: Residents of a house 99 in Gurteenroe Street (Macroom, Cork)

Surname Forename Age Sex Relation to head Religion
Jenkinson Sarah 36 Female Head of Family Roman Catholic
Jenkinson George Patrick 12 Male Son Roman Catholic
Jenkinson Annie 10 Female Daughter Roman Catholic
Jenkinson James Francis 8 Male Son Roman Catholic
Jenkinson Edward 3 Male Son Roman Catholic
Jenkinson Benjamin 2 Male Son Roman Catholic

1911 census: Son Henry John is with his grandparents in Newmarket

Marriage of Johanna Jenkinson and John Loftus on 21 September 1937 in Macroom. She gave an address of Coolcower.

Marriage of BENJAMIN JENKINSON and Mary SHEEHY on 31 October 1944. His address is Coolcower. [3]

Benjamin died at 13 Springview Terrace, Commons Road, Cork on March 27th 1946, aged 78. His wife Sarah was present at death. [GMaps: 13 Springview Terrace]
(Maybe he moved to his daughter’s house on the Commons Road to be cared for late in life)

Death of Sarah Jenkinson of 14 Springview Terrace Commons Road on May 10th 1963, aged 90, OAP, cerebral haemorrage, Joan Loftus Daughter 14 Springview terrace.

Marriage of Richard (Dick) Jenkinson and Eileen Kenneally of Newmarket [4] [5] [a]. Eileen’s mother was Johanna O’Callaghan of Liscahane, Millstreet, born to Margaret (Buckley) and Cornelius Joseph O’Callaghan (a farmer) on November 26th 1897. [1911][5] She married Timothy O’Callaghan of Newmarket in 1924.

[ancestry: jbjenkinson2]
[fb:dj]

Frank Creedon of Adrivale, shot dead in 1921

Born in 1880 Francis Creedon was the son of Michael and Abby Creedon, farmers from Adrivale. In 1902 he joined the police force, the Royal Irish Constabulary, a peaceful time when a job as a policeman was seen as being well paid with a pension. He served in Armagh, Kerry,  Coachford and Blarney. He married Hannah O’Reilly of Blarney in 1916, after which he was moved to Clashmore, and Tallow in Waterford.

On the morning of Saturday July 2nd 1921, a blistering hot day, he and nine other policemen were sent on patrol from Tallow Police Barracks, which they did every day. This was at the height of the War of Independence and tensions were high. Unfortunately for the patrol, the I.R.A. had been observing their movements, and it was noticed that their usual procedure was to take different roads on alternate days on departure from the town. With rifles and machine guns, the I.R.A. took up positions in the Old Military Barracks, and on an adjoining hill on the expectation that they would move out by a certain road. However, the patrol went by an adjoining road which did not exactly meet the positions the I.R.A. had taken up.

In haste, those positioned on the hill fired early, leaving those positioned in the Old Barrack a couple of hundred yards away from their target, instead of 30 yards away as intended. Not ideal from an attacking viewpoint, which was further complicated by couple of loads of hay on the street during the attack.

When the firing ceased after about ten minutes, the ambush parties withdrew to Boultha, Ballynoe, and later to Castlelyons area. Constable Francis Creedon lay dead, two more policemen wounded, while the remaining policemen had rushed into some adjoining houses and escaped the fire. Francis had been killed in the first volley of firing and died immediately, shot in the head and above the heart.

He was buried in the middle of the night two days later July 4th at Drishane Cemetery, leaving behind a young wife and two small children. Nine days later (July 11th) the ceasefire was called and the War of Independence was over.  [read more …] “Frank Creedon of Adrivale, shot dead in 1921”

Edmund Prendiville, RIC (Millstreet 1903-1905)

Edmond Prendiville was born near Listowen in County Kerry in 1871. He joined the RIC at the age of twenty-four (1896) and served in the counties of Monaghan,  Cork, and Tipperary. Six years after joining (1903) he was promoted to acting sergeant, and moved to Millstreet. His time here was relatively uneventful, and he remained in Millstreet for two years before he was moved to take charge in Union Hall. About 1912 he was moved to Tipperary where spent the rest of his time in the force until he was demobilised on  April 3rd 1922.

The following day, he was enlisted into the Civic Guard. Prendiville claimed that he had approached a senior Sinn Féin member during the War of Independence about his intention to retire from the force and stated that ‘he advised me not to on any account, that I was much more useful where I was’. Before his demobilisation, Prendiville had been serving in Clonmel, County Tipperary, and was active in the RIC Representative Body. He was part of a delegation that travelled three times to London in 1921 to discuss future policing arrangements in Ireland with Sir Hamar Greenwood. During the course of the meetings, he came into ‘constant touch’ with senior Sinn Féin representatives at the Treaty negotiations, and was later asked to become a member of the organising committee. On accepting a place on the committee, Prendiville was placed on the ‘Training’ sub-committee and offered a position in the Civic Gua rd.

In May 1922 he was one of five officers abruptly removed from their posts in an incident called the Kildare Mutiny, where trainee Civic Guards protested at the appointment of former RIC officers to the Civic Guard.

After that he lived in Kilmainham where he married Hanna O’Leary. He died in Dr. Steeven’s Hospital 1948. [read more …] “Edmund Prendiville, RIC (Millstreet 1903-1905)”

Lest We Forget (14) – January 12th – 31st, 1920

(Continuing our series on the events of 1920 with the help of the daily newspaper of the First Dáil, the Irish Bulletin.)

LEST WE FORGET (14)

The following are the Acts of Aggression Committed in Ireland by the Armed Military and Police of the Usurping English Government – as reported in the Irish Daily Press, for the Week Ending JANUARY 17th, 1920.
Summary.

MONDAY, JANUARY 12th, 1920.

Raids:- Armed police raided the residence of Mr. P. P. Doyle, Chairman of the Athy Urban District Council, in order to dismantle his Motor car. The car was not on the premises. The Sinn Fein Election Rooms were raided at Kingstown Co. Dublin, and all available Election Literature was seized. The literature was being used in the Municipal Election campaign now proceeding throughout Ireland. At Tullamore and in the surrounding districts, armed police raided and searched upwards of 50 houses.
Arrests:- A young man named Cunningham was seized in his mother’s house, and taken to the Bridewell, Dublin, on a charge of discharging firearms. He was subsequently released.  [read more …] “Lest We Forget (14) – January 12th – 31st, 1920”

Lest We Forget (11) – November 17th-29th 1919

(Continuing our series on the events of 1919 with the help of the daily newspaper of the First Dáil, the Irish Bulletin.)

LEST WE FORGET (11)

THE FOLLOWING ARE ACTS OF AGGRESSION COMMITTED IN IRELAND BY THE MILITARY AND POLICE OF THE USURPING ENGLISH GOVERNMENT – AS REPORTED IN THE DAILY PRESS, FOR THE WEEK ENDING NOVEMBER 22nd, 1919.

The Sentences passed on political offenders in the above six days totalled seven years, seven months, and two weeks.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17th, 1919.
Raids:- Armed police raided the offices of the “Clare Champion” a weekly paper published at Ennis, and carried away type and other property.
Arrests:- Mr. Martin Thornton, Irish Language teacher, and Mr. Patrick Hohan, both of Tucker Street, Castlebar, were arrested on a charge of sedition. Mr. Leo Callaghan was arrested at Mallow, Co. Cork, on a charge of participating in an endeavour to obtain arms on a charge of illegal assembly.
Sentences:- Mr. Patrick J. O’Brien of Kells, Co. Meath was sentenced by courtmartial to imprisonment for one year and six months on a charge of possessing ammunition. Messrs. Martin, Thornton and Patrick Hohan, above mentioned were tried by “Crimes Court” and each sentenced to two months’ imprisonment. Thornton on a charge of reciting at a concert and the latter on a charge of singing a patriotic ballad: “The Dublin Brigade”. Mr. Michael Costello, above mentioned, was sentenced to two weeks imprisonment on a charge of “unlawful assembly”. The police witnesses declared that the unlawful assembly consisted in singing a song while passing the police. At Nenagh eight young men named Clery, Loughnane, Ahern, Herbert, Carroll, Kelly and Greene, were each sentenced to six months’ imprisonment for “unlawful assembly” and endeavouring to obtain arms. All the prisoners mentioned as sentenced in this list refused to recognise the right to try them of the Courts before which they were brought.  [read more …] “Lest We Forget (11) – November 17th-29th 1919”