Mushera Volunteers Easter 1916 Plaque Unveiling Celebrations DVD now available

A new DVD has been produced of the Plaque unveiling in Aubane Community Centre which took place last December to remember the 1916 Mushera Company of Irish Volunteers, the price of the DVD is 10 Euro and copies are available from Noreen Kelleher Aubane and Noreen can be contacted on 087 9486673 if you wish to purchase a Copy.

 

Does anyone know of Crippleford?

Bob Kenney has been researching his family tree and is stuck at his great great great grandmother. She was Ellen Healy of Crippleford, and her marriage to Timothy Buckley on June 1, 1833 is listed in the Dromtarriffe Parish Register.

He had been trying to locate Crippleford, but after some time failed, so he asked us, but we’ve never heard of it, and no-one we asked has heard of it either. So we’re wondering if anyone of our readers has heard of it, or could ask someone that might know. Bob would be delighted if someone could help him out. If so please leave a comment below, or contact us directly [contact details are on our Contact Page].

A few thoughts:

1.. There are a couple of references to Crippleford online, all referring to “Thomas Wallace born Jan.6, 1806 in Rethcool, Duhallow, Cripleford on the Blackwater in County Cork,Ireland”. [1] [2]. There are also more references to Crippleford in the parish register, so it’s safe to say that the name did/does exist in the Dromtarriffe Parish area.

2.. It was normal for continue reading the full article “Does anyone know of Crippleford?”

The Attack on the Carnegie Hall (Jan 4th 1923)

The Carnegie Hall, the Town Hall in January 1923 which was not taken

We thank John P. Kelleher whose Grandfather, John Kelleher of Dromsicane, Millstreet is mentioned in the following truly superbly researched feature by Michael…for reminding us of the upcoming anniversary.   

Tomorrow (4th Jan. 2017) is the 94th anniversary of the Attack on Millstreet’s Carnegie Hall.   Due to the inspiring courage of people like John Kelleher we still have this splendid building which provides such important services for the entire community.  (S.R.)

1923 – A column of 65 Anti-Treaty fighters from Cork and Kerry IRA units, under Tom Barry, attacks Millstreet, Cork, under cover of darkness. They use 12 machine guns and take three National Army posts in the town, taking 39 prisoners and capturing one Lewis gun and 35 rifles. However they fail to take the main post in the Town Hall, held by 23 Free State soldiers. They withdraw after several hours – one party to Ballyvourney in Cork and the other to the Pap mountains in Kerry. Two Free State soldiers are killed and several more wounded. The National Army reports six Anti-Treaty fatalities and 19 wounded but the Republicans admit to only three wounded – from Stair na hÉirean

MILLSTREET AND AUGHRIM  (from: “The Munster Republic: The Civil War in North Cork”)
The new year began on a relatively quiet note. Round-ups were carried out in Churchtown on 2 January and in Newtown on 3 January. However, the Cork Examiner of 6 January reported that fire was opened on continue reading the full article “The Attack on the Carnegie Hall (Jan 4th 1923)”

WWI: Capt Eugene John McSwiney (1890-1916)

eugene-john-mcswiney-02Fresh out of UCD medical school in 1915 where he qualified in surgery and midwifery, Eugene John McSwiney like most in the medical school before him at the time joined the British Army, presumably to get experience for his new qualification.

The Royal Army Medical Corps was probably considered one of the safer jobs in the army as you weren’t being bombarded, but a little over a year later on St.Steven’s Day 1916 (100 years ago today) the doctor from Rathroe House Eugene John had passed away from pneumonia at the Naval Barracks in Devonport (Plymouth), England, after which his body was returned to Ireland and buried in Millstreet Church Graveyard, one of only two from WWI to be buried there.

Born in Johnstown House, Kilmichael on December 7th 1890, an only child to Margaret McCarthy (of Dromagh) and Dr. Morgan McSwiney. Morgan was the local doctor and Justice of the Peace, but he died young of gallstones in 1906, and a few years later in the 1911 census, Margaret and Eugene John had moved and were living with Margaret’s Brother Michael and family in Ardnageeha Dispensary, near Cullen. Soon after that they moved to Rathroe House, Derrinagree with Margaret’s other brothers where Margaret lived until she passed away in 1936.

Eugene John entered Queens College Cork medical school in 1908, and did well, being awarded prizes in Botany and Chemistry in his first year. He moved to UCD Medical School in 1912, and finished his final exams in Midwifery and Surgery in 1915. From there he joined the the Royal Army Medical Corps, and little did he expect to be gone himself in just over a year. continue reading the full article “WWI: Capt Eugene John McSwiney (1890-1916)”

Millstreet Old Age Pensions

MILLSTREET OLD AGE PENSION COMMITTEE – Very Rev. J.Canon Casey, P.P. V.F., Chairman, presided. There were 136 claims before the meeting; 96 claims were passed at the maximum of 2s 6d; 8 were allowed 2s, and 2 were allowed 1s6d per week, and the remainder adjourned to the next meeting; 4 claims were passed for the Old Age Pension at the rate of 5s per week, and 2 cases were sent forward for reinvestigation. Since October 20th, the Committee have passed 350 claims, over 300 being allowed 2s 6d , and the remainder from 2s, 1s 6d and 1s per week, a large number of claims for the district not being heard yet. The Committe haveheld several special meetings so as to facilitate the passing of the claims – Irish Examiner 22nd December 1916

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The Old Age Pensions Act 1908 introduced a non-contributory pension for eligible people aged 70 and over. It was implemented from January 1909 in England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. To be eligible, applicants had to be 70 years old, to have an income of less than £31.10.00 per annum and to ‘be of good character’. During the first three months of 1909, continue reading the full article “Millstreet Old Age Pensions”

Con O’Callaghan stands up for local Carriage Makers (1st Dec 1916)

At the quarterly meeting of Cork County Council, Millstreet’s local representative, Cors O’Callaghan (of Altamount House) proposed a resolution requesting the people not to purchase imported carriages and traps and keep local jobs in Ireland. You might say that things have not changed much in the hundred years since ! O’Callaghan also agrued against low wages, and the problems with the newly introduced Daylight Saving Time.

1916-12-01-con-ocallaghan-stands-up-for-trap-makers-02_rsz1916-12-01-con-ocallaghan-stands-up-for-trap-makers-01_rsz

Munster and Leinster Bank opens in Millstreet (Nov 1916)

1916-11-28-munster-and-leinster-bank-millstreet_rszOne hundred years ago, the Munster and Leinster Bank opened in Millstreet. The Bank manager at opening was E.V. Heffernan, who was newly promoted from the Dungarvan Branch. In 1966 Munster and Leinster merged with Provincial Bank of Ireland, the Royal Bank of Ireland to become the AIB Bank which we still have today. continue reading the full article “Munster and Leinster Bank opens in Millstreet (Nov 1916)”

Video: Angela on RTÉ in 1971, 1975 & 1986

On Saturday week the 19th Angela Collins will launch her book at Green Glens (details in Seán’s article from yesterday). Back in 1971 she featured in an interview on the ‘Enterprise’ programme on RTÉ TV. Watch that interview below (from the RTÉ archives)

… in 1986 she received the Bowmaker Award from Minister for Finance John Bruton at an award ceremony at Jury’s Hotel : continue reading the full article “Video: Angela on RTÉ in 1971, 1975 & 1986”

Colonel John Leader of Keale House

john-leader-of-keale-house-01“Colonel John Leader is, above all things, modest, for he insists on saying, when asked about his life, ‘My hideous past?’ Why nothing exciting ever happened to me.” Passing over the fact that he has seen service with all the allies but one, has been an interpreter of Japanese, Chinese and German, Colonel Leader said, “I guess the thing I was most proud of was winning my ‘blues’ at college.” Blues are what Americans call letters meaning that Colonel Leader was a “letter man” at his school. He won letters in mostly everything. He was captain of the hockey, polo, soccer and lawn tennis teams.”

John Leader was born in Quetta, a high-altitude city in modern-day Pakistan, to Irish parents in 1877. He was born into a long line of military men; his father, Surgeon-Major John Leader, was a colonel who enjoyed a distinguished career in the British military service. He left India when a small boy, and journeyed to his family home in Ireland. The Leaders have an old moated hall at Keale in Cork, where the last fourteen John Leaders have lived. The old family name was Temple until the time of the Battle of Boynewater, when John Temple from Keale took such an important part in the conflict that King William renamed him Leader, and Leaders they have remained. Although born in India, Colonel Leader is thoroughly Irish, and has all the Irish humor of his ancestors. continue reading the full article “Colonel John Leader of Keale House”

WWI: Lieutenant William Felix MacCarthy O’Leary

william-felix-mccarthy-oleary
William Felix MacCarthy O’Leary

Lieut. Wm. F. MacCARTHY O’LEARY, Royal Munster Fusiliers.
Killed in action in France on September 7th, 1916. Aged 22.

In “Billy” MacCarthy O’Leary we have lost one who was so recently amongst us that many boys still at the College remember well the tall form and good-humoured face of one who was a general favourite with his school-fellows. The notice from The Times for September 9th, which we print below, briefly summarises his career :-

“Lieut. William Felix MacCarthy O’Leary, Royal Munster Fusiliers, killed on September 7th, 1916, aged 22, was the son o f the late Lieut. Col. W. MacCarthy O’Leary and Mrs. O’Leary, of Coomlagane House, Millstreet, Co. Cork. His father was killed in action while commanding the 1st Bn. The South Lancashire Regt. at Pieter’s Hill, Natal, on February 27th, 1900. He was educated at Stonyhurst College, Lancashire, and when war broke out was at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, whence he was gazetted to the Royal Munster Fusiliers. He was with his battalion at the Dardanelles, and was wounded in the attack on June 28th, 1915. He rejoined his regiment in August, but was sent down to Alexandria with enteric (typhoid), and after some months’ illness was invalided home last December. He rejoined his regiment at the front in July. His two elder brothers are serving in the South Lancashire Regt. and the Royal Irish Fusiliers.”

In a letter to Mrs. MacCarthy O’Leary acquainting her with her son’s death, the Colonel of the regiment wrote :— continue reading the full article “WWI: Lieutenant William Felix MacCarthy O’Leary”

Felix Joseph McCarthy

mr-felix-mccarthy-montonette-and-coomloganeFELIX MACCARTHY, J.P., Montenotte House, Cork; son of the late Denis MacCarthy O’Leary, of Coomlagane House, Millstreet; born March, 1829, at Coomlagane; educated at Everton College, Cork.

He was a Justice of the Peace for counties Cork and Clare; Resident Magistrate for seventeen years in Roscommon, Castlerea, Longford, Kilmallock, and Limerick, and for thirteen years in Belfast.

Married, February 15th, Maria, daughter of William Hodnett, and has issue five sons,

  • William Serle, born December 5th, 1855, Captain in the Argentine Navy ;
  • Felix Denis Francis, born November lIth, 1857, Colonel Commanding Royal Engineers, Dublin;
  • Charles, born in November, 1860, electrical engineer;
  • Augustus, born June, 1865, Superintending Engineer Public Works Department, India; and
  • Morgan John, born November 25th, 1867, Major Royal Field Artillery, who was in the 13th.

Mr. Felix MacCarthy. J.P. Battery during the Boer war, and was in Ladysmith during the selge.
Clubs: County. Cork, and Royal Cork Yacht.
He died at his home Montonette House on 1st July 1914 in the presence of his son Morgan John McCarthy continue reading the full article “Felix Joseph McCarthy”

“Millstreet” by Julia A.Sullivan

millstreet-a-general-view-1909
A General View of Millstreet – from the Lawrence Collection (approx 1910)

Millstreet, quaint and quiet village
Nestling mid your emerald hills
Though I see you but in memory
How my heart with rapture thrills.

Gentle stream & busy mill-wheel
Smile beneath the summer sky
Church & convent calm & peaceful
Welcome still the passer by

Friends the nearest, friends the dearest
I can see them now at will
And the sunshine of their kindness
So abiding with me still

continue reading the full article ““Millstreet” by Julia A.Sullivan”

O’Leary Letter from Adrivale – December 1918 (2nd of 3)

At the end of 1918, World War I was just over to the relief of all. Delivery of letters over and back across the atlantic returned to normality, and Patrick O’Leary of Adrivale wrote letters to his sister and brother in America, giving them the news of Ireland and his reaction to hearing that his nephew Patsy from Ohio was among the troops in France. Below is the second of three letters sent to us by Patsy’s grandson Patrick O’Leary, which was written to his sister Sister Mary Francis in the US.
As it happens Patrick arrived in Ireland today for the O’Leary Clan Gathering in Ballyvourney this week.
1918-12-23-oleary-letter-from-adrivale-page-01 continue reading the full article “O’Leary Letter from Adrivale – December 1918 (2nd of 3)”

The Millstreet Bank Robbery

1920-08-07 - Irish Republican Police Unravel Astounding Bank Robbery - Western Australia Record_rszFollowing on from some recent discussion into the execution of Daniel Buckley near Millstreet in 1920, the background to his fate lies in the Millstreet Bank Robbery of 1919. Below is the 2011 publication by the Aubane Historical Society which outlined the before, during and the after of the robbery:

INTRODUCTION

The Millstreet bank robbery of November 1919 was a sensational event. It involved an enormous sum of money for the time – £16,700 – which would be worth at least half a million Euro today. (The average farm labourer’s weekly wage was then £1.10s.6d.).

But more importantly it created a real challenge for the new Irish government that had been formed earlier that year. There were then two governments in the country – the new legitimate Irish Government and the now illegal British government that had been rejected overwhelmingly in the 1918 General Election.

There was a full scale war developing between the two. Part of this war was a propaganda war and the robbery was used by the British Government as an example of what would allegedly happen if the Irish Government was allowed control of the country. It was even freely suggested that the robbery was carried out by the Irish Government.

continue reading the full article “The Millstreet Bank Robbery”

Dan Lucey executed in Kilcorney for Spying

Macroom man Dan Lucey, who was of good family, was married and his brother was a priest. He was of violent temper and he was quarrelsome in disposition. In January 1921, he had fallen out with a few IRA Volunteers in Ballinagree, and was later seen talking to the Auxiliaries in Macroom. So he was visited by two IRA Volunteers from Donoughmore area disguised as British officers. He was asked if he had seen any of “the boys”—meaning IRA men—lately. He gave his questioners all the information he had, while unknownst to him, other men from Rusheen Company waited outside the door. He was taken prisoner on the spot, taken north of Mushera to Kilcorney, and was held prisoner for about a fortnight, during which time he was given a fair trial by the brigade staff and sentenced to death. He was shot and buried after in Kilcorney, by the Millstreet Battalion, Cork II Brigade.

continue reading the full article “Dan Lucey executed in Kilcorney for Spying”

Audio: Millstreet Community Singers on Round the Fireside

Programme one featuring Millstreet Community Singers, interviews with Tom & Noreen Meaney, organised by Seán Radley, which was on Jimmy Reidy’s “Round the Fireside” show on c103 Radio last Monday night. Part two will feature next Monday evening.

1916 Heritage Day – next Sunday

Heritage Day Millstreet Country Park 28th Aug(final)
Also, please note that to make it a more interactive day, people are asked to bring their own piece of 1916 up to the park for the day. This could be a picture of a family member, items used during the time or some other items to synonymous with that time in Ireland. Seán Radley will be up to show a few pieces himself and it would be lovely to have others contributing and sharing stories.

Private Cornelius Rahilly 10714

rahilly-photoOn seeing Seán’s article yesterday on the anniversary of the death of Roger Casement, Carmel reminded us of her grandfather local man Con O’Rahily who was one of the men in Casement’s Brigade.

Born on February 14th 1895 at the home of Mary Kelleher and Cornelius Rahilly, at Dooneen. He joined the Royal Irish Regiment in May 1913, and arrived in France on August 13th that same year.He was soon captured in the retreat from Mons. His battalion had retreated under the weight of the advancing Germans. After two days of retreating with little food nor water, pounded continually by German artillery, the next night their officer got them lost in the dark, and they woke the next morning looking down the wrong end of a German machine gun. He describes how the 15 of them captured were deliberately machine gunned by the Germans, and only 9 survived, including the officer. The Germans suspected them of using dumdum bullets and it took a great deal of negotiation by the officer to get their lives spared. As a prisoner of war, he was moved from camp to camp, until one day a German officer was recruiting for an Irish Brigade. Within this brigade Roger Casement made a recruiting speech in February 1915. Casement sought to send a well-equipped and well-organized Irish unit to Ireland, to fight against Britain, in the aim of achieving independence for Ireland. Such an action was to be concurrent with the ongoing war between Britain and Germany, thereby providing indirect aid to the German cause, without the ex-POWs fighting in the Imperial Germany Army itself. In spite of his eloquence only the 56 joined, but Con was one of those. They were trained by continue reading the full article “Private Cornelius Rahilly 10714”

Unveiling of a Monument to the ‘Bard’

Book - The Bard - front coverUNVEILING OF A MONUMENT TO ‘THE BARD’ AT 2PM ON SUNDAY, 14TH AUGUST AT THE KERRYMANS TABLE ON THE BUTTER ROAD IN AUBANE

Seán Riobaird O Súilleabháin was the acknowledged leader of the Land War in the North Cork area. He was universally known as ‘the Bard’ though he was not a poet but the nickname was taken from the Irish of name, Riobaird. He played such a distinctive role that he had to have a recognisable nickname.

He was born in Glenleigh, Kilcorney on the 4th of February 1852 and became involved in the Land War in the late 1870s when the Land League was leading the struggle for tenant farmers’ rights. Because of his courage and daring in the Land War he quickly became a hero to the people but public enemy number one for the authorities in North Cork.

His wife, Ellen O Mullane was a devoted wife and partner in his struggles. They lived in a house supplied by the Land League in Glantane East.

With constant harassment and convictions the authorities were determined to remove him from the leadership but could not do so in his native area as no jury would convict him… continue reading the full article “Unveiling of a Monument to the ‘Bard’”

Parish Collection in aid of the Polish People

1916-01-01 collection in aid of the polish people_rszOn Sunday 26th December 1915 a church-gate collection was taken up in all parishes in the Diocese of Kerry, in aid of the Polish people, who were in the depths of WWI.

Our own troubles in Ireland had not kicked off yet, but WWI weighed on the country. Surprisingly,  we were actually one of the wealthiest countries in Europe, mainly due to being part of the Brtish Empire.

But it is interesting to see that the Millstreet people gave much more than many other bigger parishes. So, it begs the question: what was the factor that influenced disproportionate collection locally at the time?

(the list is from the Kerryman  January 1st 1916)